Cameron Homeyer- April 11

Abstract: The tropopause separates the well-mixed troposphere, which is greatly impacted by day-to-day variations in the weather (cyclones, fronts, convection, breaking waves, etc.), from the stable layered stratosphere, which is often slow to change and retains much of its characteristics for long time periods (months to years).

Start

April 11, 2019 - 4:00 pm

End

April 11, 2019 - 5:00 pm

Address

120 David L Boren Blvd, Norman, OK 73072   View map
Name:     Cameron R. Homeyer
Title:    The Tropopause: A Literal Interface Linking Weather to Climate
Location: NWC 1313
Date:     2019/04/11
Time:     4:00 PM
Abstract: The tropopause separates the well-mixed troposphere, which is greatly impacted by day-to-day variations in the weather (cyclones, fronts, convection, breaking waves, etc.), from the stable layered stratosphere, which is often slow to change and retains much of its characteristics for long time periods (months to years). At times, interactions between weather and the tropopause layer can lead to changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the stratosphere that can ultimately impact climate. Namely, transport of air and greenhouse gases across the tropopause (stratosphere-troposphere exchange) can lead to changes in radiative forcing seasonally and annually that drive climate variability and change. To highlight these complex interactions between weather, the tropopause, and climate, this talk will review two core areas of my recent/ongoing research: 1) tropopause characteristics and long-term changes, and 2) tropopause-overshooting convection and stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Tropopause characteristics and long-term changes are evaluated using long-term radiosonde observations and modern atmospheric reanalyses. Tropopause-overshooting convection and stratosphere-troposphere exchange is diagnosed using a combination of ground-based radar observations, high-resolution satellite imagery, and convection-allowing model simulations. These efforts aim to improve our understanding of the tropopause layer and its composition, which is an important and sensitive component of the climate system.

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