School of Meteorology Seminar Series: Speaker

This is a joint seminar with the OU Department of Geography & Environmental Sustainability

CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION POLICIES IN THE U.S. AND AUSTRALIA

Dr. David Karoly
School of Earth Sciences
University of Melbourne, Australia

Dr. William Hooke
Senior Policy Fellow
American Meteorological Society

Professor Karoly joined the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne in May 2007 after receiving a Federation Fellowship from the Australian Research Council. From 2003 to 2007, he was the Williams Chair Professor of Meteorology in the School of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma. During 2001-2002, he was Professor of Meteorology and Head of the School of Mathematical Sciences at Monash University in Melbourne. From August 1995, he was Director of the Cooperative Research Centre for Southern Hemisphere Meteorology at Monash University until it closed in June 2000. In 1993, Professor Karoly received the Meisinger Award from the American Meteorological Society. In 1998, he received the Norbert Gerbier-Mumm International Award from the World Meteorological Organization for a joint research paper with ten international collaborators. In 1999, he was elected a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society for outstanding contributions to the atmospheric sciences over a substantial period of years.

William H. Hooke, Ph.D., is associate executive director of the American Meteorological Society, where he has been a senior policy fellow since 2000. Educated as a physicist and an atmospheric scientist at Swarthmore College and the University of Chicago, he worked for the U.S. Department of Commerce from 1967-2000, in a series of research and management positions, including NOAA Deputy Chief Scientist and Acting Chief Scientist, and Senior Scientist in the Office of the Secretary. He chaired the NAS/NRC Disasters Roundtable from 2003-2009. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2006.

Presentation abstract

School of Meteorology Seminar Series website